Pathways

18 Jan

As promised: the first part about trying to get a job in Australia for a longer period of time.

As a Dutch EP, SEH arts KNMG, you are not recognised as a consultant EM in Australia (www.amc.org.au). The primary reason is that, to be eligible for ‘the specialist pathway’ (http://www.medicalboard.gov.au/Registration/International-Medical-Graduates/Specialist-Pathway.aspx), you need to be an overseas qualified specialist, which we are not with our ‘profiel-specialisme’. Our training is not comparable anyway, neither in duration as in content.

From our current position, we can work temporarily in Australia (2 years) as specialist-in-training via the Specialist Pathway (weird but yes!), or via the Limited Pathway for example for postgraduate training, supervised practice or to work in an area of need. For the Specialist-in-training pathway you need to hand over an official declaration that you’re in the last term of your training etc. These pathways comprise a lot of paperwork, with official translations approved by a notary public etc, but there’s no exam. All this is explained on the AMC website.

However, you need a job offer first, and your future employer will help you with all the required documents. After you certificates have been approved your employer consequently sponsors your 4-5-7 visa.

If you want to work longer or want to be eligible for the EM Training program you have to choose the Standard Pathway, which essentially means that you’ve got to to do a lot of paperwork also AND you have to pass the AMC MCQ.

– Begin with asking our Australian MNSHA mentors anything you want to know (they are extremely helpful) and with reading as much as possible about Overseas Trained Doctors on the AMC- and Medical Board of Australia websites. Pay special attention to alle the requirements listed, because a little mistake / miss in your documentation prolongs the time and raises the costs of application significantly

– Apply at the AMC (they charge a fee) with the online Standard Pathway Application form

– You receive an AMC candidate number

– Meanwhile you 1. find a job and 2. do an English language proficiency test (I recommend an intensive preparation course of one week before you take the test)

– Finding the job can be a bit difficult. A lot of hospitals do not / are not allowed to employ overseas doctors when there are suitable Australian candidates. It is useful to contact colleagues or a few hospitals for information; generally they are helpful and able to recommend ED’s / colleagues that are willing to employ overseas colleagues.

– You complete and sign the AMC form, attach all the required documents and send it to Australia by post for primary source verification = EICS verification: your primary qualification in medicine has to be assessed and recognised

– The required documents to send with it are: 1. your primary qualification plus translation, done by a certified translator and a confirmation from a notary public that it’s the same as the original. 2. a copy of your passport. 3. two passport sized foto’s (the AMC website explains what kind exactly). 4. a copy of your English Language Testing System Test Report (eg IELTS) with photograph.

– Be sure that you send it registered and with a trustworthy company. I used DHL, and it was delivered within a week. However, I heard from a colleague that his took weeks to arrive. The AMC responds quite fast.

– To be ahead of things I also sent a copy from my passport with a confirmation from a notary public, my IELTS result with confirmation from a notary public, my details of my BIG registration, my certificate of the EM training programme and results, my SOSG certificate and MSRC registration, all with certified translations and the confirmation of the translation / copy from the notary public. It was probably too much (and too expensive), but other than what I heard from colleagues about sending and resending because of incomplete documents, I received confirmation and a ‘pass’  within weeks.

– When you receive the confirmation of your primary qualification, you can apply online (with your AMC candidate number) for the AMC MCQ exam. You get an email when you are allowed to sit the exam, and an online module helps you planning a date and location which suits you

– It is not possible to sit the exam in the Netherlands. Venues are listed on the AMC website. I will tell a bit more about the exam preparation after I sat mine, because only then I can share my approach as a possibly useful method

– After passing the exam, you can apply to the Medical Board for a Limited Registration, but only when you have secured a job offer!

– The Limited Registration means that you have to complete 12 months of supervised practice. Within that period you have to pass the AMC Clinical Exam

– The next step is to apply to the Medical Board for General Registration. That means you are allowed to work in the Australian Health Care System

– AND THEN, FINALLY, with the General Registration in hand, you should be able to apply to the ACEM for the training programme. How that is supposed to work…. I hope to tell you next year…

Well, this is what I know up to now. In March I will post some information about the AMC MCQ preparation.

Grtz! Laura

PS: also a lot of information on http://www.artsinaustralie.nl from Karen and on http://www.NVSHA.nl from Sander Manders (http://nvsha.nl/images/Tips_voor_werken_als_Emergency_Physician_in_het_buitenland_versie_2014-05.pdf)

Inspired to go abroad but not THAT far? (in dutch…)

18 Jan

‘ Working in the UK’ , a document written by Leonieke Vlaanderen, a Dutch ED doc, who recently worked as clinical fellow A&E in the Royal Sussex County Hospital, Brighton, after that as Anaesthetic clinical fellow and currently as HEMS registrar (Kent, Surrey & Sussex Air ambulance Trust).

Werken in de UK-2 In Dutch!

 

Pols# en echo

18 Jan

Geachte collega’s,

Een videolezing van Gael Smits, SEH arts KNMG Eindhoven, over echogeleid reponeren van polsfracturen.

Groet, Laura

https://vimeo.com/115192064

LPA 8 wervelkolom immobilisatie – wat is de evidence?

9 Dec

Dear international colleagues, this PPP is written in Dutch by our registrar in training, Mark van Zanten, so you will not be able to read this.

It’s an overview of the evidence that’s used to change the prehospital guideline for (C-)spine immobilisation.

Voor de Nederlandse collega’s: wellicht dat jullie dit kunnen gebruiken om locaal alert te zijn bij de overname van een trauma-patient en zelf te besluiten of mn CWK immobilisatie (alsnog) geindiceerd is en hoe.

Regards / groet, Laura

WK immobilisatie 2015

Working in Australia

3 Nov

Dear colleagues,

Currently I am registering at the Australian Medical Council (AMC) to be able to apply for the EM training in Australia.

Two of our Dutch colleagues already are FACEM, they enrolled in the training program about 10 years ago. The rules have changed quite a lot since then, and nowadays it is not easy to become eligible anymore.

Many others have worked or are currently working in Australia for 1-2 years, with a limited registration. That registration does not allow you to apply at the ACEM (for training).

Because of the recent changes and because I could not find a colleague who did the same, I decided to share my experiences with you. For colleagues who wish to do the same.

I will write different posts about the application process. If you have questions, do not hesitate to contact me using the contact form. If you have different experiences or you want to share yours on this website, please feel free to contact me also. My situation is about becoming an registrar in training, from my current position as SEHarts KNMG. I do not have knowledge about other pathways, for example te be eligible for the limited registration. I would welcome colleagues who want to share that information.

Regards, Laura

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 83 other followers